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ACM-ICPC World Finals

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ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (abbreviated as ACM-ICPC or just ICPC) is an annual multi-tiered computer programming competition among the universities of the world. This championship is organized into multiple levels and World Final is its top and most prestigious level.

World finalistsEdit

ACM ICPC is divided into three different phases - Regional Preliminary, Regional Final and World Final. Each year during the winter initial level of this competition starts in six different continents of the world - Asia, Africa and the Middle East, Europe & Russian Republic, South Pacific, North America and Latin America. Each continent is called a Region and consist of one or more sites. Each site hosts an individual Regional Final. Sites with many teams usually organize Regional Preliminary over online to select a specific number of teams for the Regional Final. Winning team from all the regionals from all over the world directly move to the World Final. In addition, few teams that fulfill a set criteria in ACM-ICPC bylaws receive Wild Card Entry and also move to the World Final.

World Final 2008Edit

The 2008 ACM-ICPC World Finals will be held at the Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel, in Banff, Alberta, April 6-10, 2008. The World Final is sponsored by IBM and hosted by the University of Alberta who is celebrating their 100th anniversary. Over 7,000 teams competed on six continents at the regional level. 100 of these teams will advance to the World Finals.

Past World FinalsEdit

ICPC05OpenCeremony

Opening Ceremony of ACM ICPC 2005.

2007 World FinalsEdit

The 2007 ACM-ICPC World Finals were held at the Tokyo Bay Hilton, in Tokyo, Japan, March 12-16, 2007. The World Finals was sponsored by IBM and hosted by the ACM Japan Chapter and the IBM Tokyo Research Lab. Some 6,099 teams competed on six continents at the regional level. Eighty-eight teams advanced to the World Finals. Warsaw University won its second world championship, solving 8 of 10 problems. Gold Medal Winners were Warsaw University, Tsinghua University (China), St. Petersburg Institute of Fine Mechanics and Optics (Russia), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States).

2006 World FinalsEdit

The 2006 ACM-ICPC World Finals were held in San Antonio, Texas, sponsored by IBM and hosted by Baylor University. 5,606 teams representing 1,733 universities from 84 countries competed in elimination rounds, with 83 of those teams proceeding to the world finals. Saratov State University from Russia won, solving 6 of 10 problems. Gold medal winners were Saratov, Jagiellonian University (Poland), University of Twente (The Netherlands), Altai State Technical University (Russia).

2005 World FinalsEdit

The 2005 world finals were held at Pudong Shangri-La Hotel in Shanghai on April 6, 2005, hosted by Shanghai. 4,109 teams representing 1,582 universities from 71 countries competed in elimination rounds, with 78 of those teams proceeding to the world finals. Shanghai won its second world title, with 8 of 10 problems solved. [1] Gold medal winners were Shanghai Jiaotong, Moscow State University, St. Petersburg Institute of Fine Mechanics and Optics (Russia), and University of Waterloo (Canada).


External linksEdit

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at ACM-ICPC World Finals. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with the Programmer's Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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